How To Can Change Electricity Supplier and Save The Planet

pylons for change electricity supplier

As I sit here, tapping away at my Apple extended keyboard, it’s late October 2017 in Ramsgate. We enjoyed a short Indian Summer, the clocks have just turned back, and there’s a faint smell of burning in the air. Autumn is here, the time the British generally think we should change electricity supplier.
For the first time in my life, I’ve gone and done it myself (change electricity supplier, that is).
It’s a bold move and I feel very proud of myself.
It wasn’t that long ago that British Prime Minister David Cameron declared that the Labour leader at the time, Ed Miliband, wanted us all to live in a “Marxist universe” because he’d advocated a cap on energy prices. Turn the clocks forward two years and the idea has become so mainstream, the current Conservative leader, Theresa May, announces that she’s all for the idea. Britain still has food-banks with people in extreme poverty, which indicates we are not yet living in a Marxist universe.
My experience of electricity and gas suppliers since Margaret Thatcher privatised them in the late 1980s has not been entirely positive, to say the least.
Up until now, I couldn’t see any point in changing my supplier because I was sure they are all pretty much the same. And anyway, a Labour Government was likely to win a snap election and re-nationalise electric and gas companies pretty damn quick. All I had to do was wait…
Following Labour’s general election defeat in June 2017, I realised a quick-fix solution might not immediately be on the cards. Basically, I knew it was up to me to act decisively.

Why I Wanted to Change Electricity Supplier

First of all, I don’t have gas, so changing my energy company just meant just changing the firm supplying my electricity. To be honest, they were pretty terrible, kept hiking up the prices and were constantly sending me bills for debts built up by previous tenants.
And now the Plus Points
I’ve always thought renewable energy was the way to go. When it comes to the environment, I’ve always been an idealist. For example, although I’d driven a tractor on the family farm since the age of 12, I’d never gone in for driving tests and the idea of owning a car. I lived in London and, quite frankly, there was never any need to have a vehicle of my own. I still can’t drive but now I live in Ramsgate, where public transport is more haphazard. Even so…
I was first attracted to Bulb because they only sell renewable electricity. They also seemed quite “fresh” – if that’s even a thing.
The comedian Richard Herring first put the idea in my head.
I listened to his Leicester Square Theatre podcast where he said he’d switched to this new company called Bulb, who (so far, at least) was better than his previous supplier. I read a blog he’s written about. To summarise, he said:
  • Bulb have just reduced their prices (British Gas have admitted electricity is cheaper but are putting up prices anyway).
  • They only use renewable electricity and 10% renewable gas (apparently, it’s not as easy).
  • Bulb will buy you out of any contract you may have with an existing supplier.
  • They don’t trap you in a contract and you can leave any time.
  • Bulb are almost certainly cheaper than your current provider.
It all sounded good, but there was another line. It said, “If you click on my link and change your energy supplier to Bulb:

Sounds great to me. A win/win/win/win/ situation.

My Motivation for Recommending Bulb as an Energy Supplier

I must stress that Bulb hasn’t paid me or told me to recommend them. I would be recommending them even if I didn’t get the £50. If I discover they are the worst kind of people, I promise to let you know. So far, I have to admit, they’ve been great.

Who Do You Want To Get The Money When You Change Energy Supplier?

If you want Richard Herring to get the £50 (if you sign up, you get £50 and he gets £50) click here
If you want to use Jim Driver to get the £50 (if you sign up, you get £50 and I get £50) click here
The choice is yours…

Leave a Comment

Previous post: